Gothic Teens

Emily the Strange

Who is Emily?

Emily the Strange (sometimes written as Emily Strange) is a fictional counterculture character, created by Rob Reger and his company Cosmic Debris Etc. Inc. She has become an icon for the Goth or emo subcultures whose members use her image in schoolbags, T-shirts and accessories. 

Emily is a 13-year-old (birthday: 9/23) of exceptionally pale complexion. She has jet black hair, and wears a black dress and black tights, set off by large white Mary Jane shoes. She has a dark, gothic world view. The character's appearance and demeanour could be likened to those of Wednesday Addams.

Accompanying Emily are her four black cats. Sabbath, who is distinguished by a scar on his left ear, is the troublemaker of the four and rarely seen close up. Nee-Chee, who has a black and white striped tail, is the schemer. The creative cat, Miles, has a white X on his right eye. Mystery, the leader of the group, has a white star on her right eye. Because she is the leader, she is the closest to Emily.

Tie-Ins

Emily the Strange has gained a reputation as something of a feminist comic icon, and the franchise has a considerable merchandising catalogue, including clothing, stationery, stickers, and accessories, all featuring Emily's distinctive appearance and frequently featuring one of her sayings (such as a beach-towel emblazoned with "Wish You Weren't Here"). Emily The Strange fashion is popular and attractive in the Goth subculture with young adults and teenagers and more recently attributed to the Emo subculture.

Emily comic books have been published in the USA.

The Chronicle Books hardback graphic novellas include:

  • Emily the Strange (2001)
  • Emily's Secret Book of Strange (2003)
  • Emily's Good Nightmares (2004)
  • Emily's Seeing is Deceiving (2006)

Clothing

Emily has been shown in Vanilla Sky and on MADtv. Celebrities including Julia Roberts, Britney Spears, and Björk have all worn the brand. Epiphone have created an Emily Strange themed SG guitar, based on a Gibson 310 Custom.

Novels

In October 2007 four young adult novels based on Emily the Strange were published by HarperCollins.

Film

An Emily the Strange feature film is in the works with Mike Richardson, of Dark Horse Entertainment, as producer.

Society Of Strange

The Society of Strange is the official, online Emily the Strange fan-club, forum and message board. The Society Of Strange is popular with fans of Emily The Strange; however it is also utilized as a forum for other popular cultural topics and subjects such as television shows, bands and anime. There has been some member debate over the upcoming Emily The Strange film and whether it will be good for the brand's image. Fans are highly concerned with how Emily will be represented if she is to 'talk' (as Emily has only ever 'spoken' in a read, comic format) and who will play Emily if she is displayed in a live-action context. Until more information is released about the film, fans are suggesting that Christina Ricci would be suitable for the role of Emily with her background in the Addams Family films of the 1990s.

 The Other Emily the Strange
                        
Emily Dickinson (December 10 1830 - May 15 1886) was an American poet. She developed quite a few eccentricities throughout her life. Among them, her neurotic personality, her unconventional view of Christian faith and her rejection of the traditional structure of religious practice. Her poems are often skeptical and angry, challenging many of her contemporaries' assumptions about God, death, gender, nature, and the human body. Sources say that she may have grown wild flowers and used them to show her mood in her poems.
As a teenager, Dickinson spent seven years taking classes in English and classical literature, Latin, botany, geology, history, "mental philosophy," and arithmetic. When she became an adult she spent more and more time alone and started wearing only white. There is some debate among scholars about her sexuality: some state that she was a lesbian, evidenced by passionate correspondences addressed to women (especially her sister-in-law, Susan, one of only a few people to whom she privately sent poems). She also never married.
Throughout her life she developed a case of agoraphobia, being reluctant to leave her own property, and sometimes even her own room. She did not leave her house unless it was absolutely necessary and as early as 1867, she began to talk to visitors from the other side of a door rather than speaking to them face to face.